Animal Services

The three Animal Services Officers enforce animal regulations in Laguna Woods as well as Laguna Beach.  They oversee the City's dog park, affectionately known as "Bark Park", and assist with the rehabilitation of injured wild animals and birds.  Animal Services also operates the city's Animal Shelter.


Dog Licensing
To see a printable copy of the Dog License Application, click here: Dog License Application

 

Every dog four months of age or older is required to register with the City of Laguna Beach.  New residents or dogs newly acquired shall be granted fifteen (15) days in which to comply with this section.  Dog licenses are on sale at City Hall January 1st through February 28th or at the Animal Shelter year around.

The licensing period is January 1 through December 31, and a late fee will charged for licenses purchased after February 28.  You may carry or mail your payment with the registration form to: Laguna Beach Animal Shelter, 2093 Laguna Canyon Road, Laguna Beach, CA 92651


Animal Services Fee Schedule
Click Here for the list of fees, including those for commercial facilities


Available pamphlets:

Posters and Web Pages:

Keep Your Pet Cool and Safe

Even with the windows open an inch or two, vehicle temperatures can reach 40 degrees hotter than the outside air!  Don't leave an animal in an unattended vehicle that subjects it to extreme temperatures.  Laguna Beach Municipal Code 6.24.090 Animal in Unattended Vehicle, and California Penal Code 597.7
 
Leash Law

Keep
your dog on a leash less than six feet long and make sure the person holding the leash is strong enough to control the animal! Laguna Beach Municipal Code 6.16.010 Leash required

Dogs on beaches in parks and school grounds

Laguna Beach Municipal Code 6.16.020 prohibits dogs, whether on a leash or not, from being in the following areas:

  • Prohibited on Aliso Beach, and any beaches south of Aliso Beach, at all times
  • Prohibited on any city beach north of Aliso Beach, between the hours of nine a.m. and six p.m. from June 15th to September 10th
  • Prohibited in Boat Canyon Park between June 15th and September 15th
  • Prohibited in Heisler Park at such times as City Council may fix and designate by resolution
  • Prohibited in Bluebird Park at all times
  • Prohibited in any tot lot or play equipment area of any city park or beach at all times
  • Prohibited on any public school grounds at all times, whether or not confined by leash, unless prior written authorization by school district is obtained
  • The restrictions and prohibitions shall not be applicable to dogs while they are enrolled and participating in obedience classes sponsored by the recreation department of the city, or to guide dogs for blind persons

Clean up after your dog

It is unlawful for the owner or person having charge, custody or control of any animal to fail to immediately remove and dispose of in a sanitary manner, by placing in a closed or sealed container and depositing in a trash receptacle, any feces deposited by such animal upon public or private property.

Dos and Don'ts to reduce Coyote Problems

      Do

  • Feed pets indoors or promptly remove dishes when pets have completed their meals.
  • Store bags of food indoors
  • Clear brush and dense weeds from around property (This deprives coyotes and its normal prey from shelter)
  • Place trash in barrels equipped with tight, clamping lids to prevent dumping. (Use tie-down cords if necessary)
  • Keep your cat indoors, especially at night

      Don't

  • Feed or provide water for coyotes or other wildlife
  • Put trashcans out the night before scheduled pick-up
  • Use plastic bags as garbage containers; coyotes can rip them open
  • Allow cats, rabbits, small dogs or other small pets to run loose at any time; they are easy and favored prey

Notable Statistics

  • A pet wearing identification is nine times more likely to be returned home than a pet with no identification
  • Eight out every ten dogs in U.S. animal shelters are the result of accidental breeding or backyard breeding
  • In the U.S. nearly 10 million pets are destroyed every year due to overpopulation and lack of homes